Killer (Killer, 1971)

Released in late 1971, “Killer” is the Alice Cooper band’s fourth studio album. Reaching #21 on the Billboard 200, the record continued to propel the group forward into the limelight of the music industry. With songs like “Under My Wheels,” “Be My Lover,” “Desperado,” “Halo of Flies,” and “Dead Babies,” the LP dishes up classics which are still often performed some 45+…

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God, Drugs and Rock ‘n’ Roll: An Interview with Alice Cooper

This week, we take a look at another Alice interview. In this one, he sits down with Greg Laurie, Senior Pastor of Harvest Christian Fellowship, and discusses a large number of topics. As the conversation unfolds, it becomes evident that who Alice is matters. Not just who he is now, but who he was in the past. In fact, this is a question we’ve been asked from…

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Pass The Gun Around (DaDa, 1983)

Alice’s 8th solo album, “DaDa,” was released in 1983. The last of three albums referred to as the “blackout” albums – it winds up being his final album for Warner Bros. Records. The cover art is based on a painting by surrealist artist Salvador Dali, and the album’s name references Dadaism, an early 20th century, European avant-garde art movement. However…

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Changing Arranging (Pretties For You, 1969)

“Pretties For You,” the Alice Cooper Group (ACG) debut album, was released in 1969. After ACG moves to L.A., they are introduced to Frank Zappa, producer and co-founder of Straight Records. With minimal direction, the band records the album and Zappa uses Edward Beardsley’s painting entitled Pretties for You as the cover art. The music on the record is loosely…

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Hard Hearted Alice (Muscle of Love, 1973)

“Muscle of Love,” released on November 20, 1973, was the last album recorded by the Alice Cooper Group (ACG). An album stripped of theatrical flair – it returned to the basics of Rock & Roll. Receiving mixed reviews, it managed to hit #10 on the U.S. charts. With Bob Ezrin out, the production duties were split between Jack Richardson (The Guess Who & others)…

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Going Home (Alice Cooper Goes To Hell, 1976)

This week we once again travel back to 1976. Revisiting ‘Alice Cooper Goes To Hell,’ we find ‘Going Home’ as the final track on the LP. The song is beautifully written and offers a peaceful ending to the nightmarish ordeals that precede it. The listener finds Steven, the beloved character of many Alice albums, back in his room – happy to be home even amongst his ‘dirty…

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Cold Machines (Brutal Planet, 2000)

This week’s post focuses on another track from the ‘Brutal Planet (2000)’ LP. ‘Cold Machines’ lines up perfectly with humanity and, believe it or not, the current state of the Body of Christ. Keep in mind this track was written before the age of smartphones. Before those glowing rectangles controlled us. Before we all walked around with our hands…

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From The Inside (From The Inside, 1978)

This week we take another look at ‘From The Inside’ released in 1978. The tracks and album are met with mixed reviews, yet the album is invaluable to Alice’s catalog. His heart is poured out in a way that fuses honesty, comedy, and raw emotion into a finely recorded piece. One that celebrates his journey to sobriety (and the characters he met along the way).

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Parkside Church Interview (Alice/Sheryl Cooper)

This week, we switch gears just a little bit. It’s been quite a few weeks since we looked at any interviews with Alice. Songs and lyrics can be used to paint parallels to scripture, but transformation is most clearly seen in Alice Cooper, the man, not his music. The self-proclaimed ‘poster boy for what you shouldn’t be’, who has fully embraced and embodied the parable of the…

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Nothing’s Free (The Last Temptation, 1994)

This week we again re-visit ‘The Last Temptation’. An LP which is full of insight and direction of Biblical proportion. Alice admits, “It’s a very strong concept album, a real morality play.” The album does a great job bridging the gap between generations of Alice fans as well. It’s a well-received record and a fan favorite. On that album there are songs about choice, virtue…

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Freedom (Raise Your Fist and Yell, 1987)

Revisiting ‘Raise Your Fist and Yell’, we look at “Freedom” this week. A song written in protest of the PMRC (Parent’s Music Resource Center), an organization designed to oversee and promote parental control over music it deemed violent, drug-related, or sexual in nature. The  bipartisan Washington D.C.-based group, co-founded by the “Washington Wives”, sought to…

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The Song That Didn’t Rhyme (The Eyes of Alice Cooper, 2003)

Didn’t expect to revisit ‘The Eyes of Alice Cooper ‘album so soon, but it seems fitting after this past week’s media circus. This post focuses on a humorous track entitled “The Song That Didn’t Rhyme”. A song, unlike its title, which is actually pretty catchy and has found its way on my playlist from time to time. Alice admits, “it’s just one of those songs that was a joke…

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